MTM Writing Clinic
MLK 252 
Phone: 713-313-7981
Email: owl@tsu.edu


Revising a Thesis

Revising a thesis, like revising a paper, is not completed once, but is a step you will take many times over the course of your paper. Writers should begin with a working thesis, a claim that is sufficient to begin the research process. Once you begin to develop evidence, you will match it to your thesis. How successful is your thesis in explaining all of the evidence you have acquired?

Make sure that you identify all of the evidence that does not fit your original thesis. However, don't throw it out! Ignoring contradictory evidence ultimately weakens your paper. Instead, explain why some evidence fits your thesis and some does not. Once this mismatch has been accounted for, you should be able to rewrite your thesis to accomodate this new evidence.

Ultimately, thesis statements must account for sometimes contradictory evidence which is why they are complex. A well-formulated thesis statement will often have words such as "however," and "although" as the thesis expands to include a deeper range of evidence.